1733 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Ambrose Philips

Ironicus, "From the Pegasus in Grub-street" Grub-Street Journal (28 June 1733).



SIR,
Having lately read a collection of entertaining and agreeable poems, I found a beautiful burlesque, or parody, of a very unmeaning copy of verses, wrote by A. P—PS Esq; which I send you to publish in your Journal. I do not doubt but the public will be pleased with the humourous ridicule of such sort of poetical productions, as are only found without sense.

TO S—RA CUZZONI.
Little Syren of the stage,
Charmer of an idle age;
Empty warbler, breathing lyre,
Wanton gale of fond desire;
Ban of ev'ry manly art,
Sweet enfeebler of the heart:
Oh, too pleasing is thy strain,
Hence, to southern climes again:
Tuneful mischief, vocal speall,
To this island bid farewell,
Leave us, as we ought to be,
Leave the Britons, rough and free.

THE FLEA. INSCRIBED TO NAMBY PAMBY.
Little hind'rer of my rest,
Thus I tear thee from my breast:
Bosom traytor! pinching harm!
Wounding me, who kept thee warm!
Through my skin thou scatter'st pains,
Crimson's o'er with circling stains.

Skipping mischief! swift as thought!
Sanguine insect—? art thou caught—!
Nought avail thy nimble springs,
Caus'd perhaps by viewless wings:
Those thy teeth that cheat our sight,
Cease their titillating bite:
I, from all thy vengeance freed,
Safe shall sleep, and cease to bleed.

Your humble servant,
IRONICUS.