1759 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Mary Darwall

William Woty, "To Miss Harriet Airy" Gentleman's Magazine 29 (July 1759) 334.



To thee, dear girl, these numbers I consign,
And bid them flow in unison with thine.
Oh! take and press them to thy tender breast,
There clasp 'em close, and let the bard be bless'd.
Let other females roll the wanton eye,
Flutter the fan, and heave th' affected sigh,
Let others flaunt it in the tawdry gown,
Proud to be thought the puppets of the town.
Be yours to deviate from this common pride,
Be each low thought and bauble laid aside.
To due decorum ever live resign'd,
And let fair virtue harmonize thy mind.
'Tis she shall warm thee with her genuine ray,
And waft thy spirit to unclouded day.
When female vanity can charm no more,
And the dull farce of foppery is o'er,
By truth illumin'd, and by virtue fir'd,
Thou, and thy moral muse shall be admir'd.
J. C.
July 10, 1759.

[Miss Harriet is desired to signify how a letter may be conveyed to her, by a line directed to J. C. at Robin's Coffee house, Shire Lane, near Temple Bar.]