1773 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Lyttelton

Anonymous, "An Elegy on the Death of the late Lord Lyttelton" General Evening Post (4 September 1773).



Now mourn, Britannia! give the plenteous tear
Of genuine sorrow; — for he, alas!
Is gone; he, who alone could justice do
To thy immortal page; — the great, the good,
The all-glorious Lyttelton is gone!
Ye sons of Albion, heave the pensive sigh!
For you will feel a loss irreparable!
In him the Statesman and the Patriot
Shone with a double lustre; in him too
Both the Poet and the Philosopher
Reflected equal brightness; — with him they're fled.
Let future ages record his virtues:
Let the mouth of Fame, in never-ceasing
Shouts, echo his praises far, far away,
To be the most distant parts of this earthly
Globe. — And, O ye Nine! who tune the chorded shell,
But chiefly thee, O Clio! (for thee he
Courted most) shall join in unremitting songs
To the honour'd name of your darling son,
To the name of LYTTELTON the Good, of LYTTELTON the Glorious.