1746 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

Anonymous, "To the Heroic, Pindaric, Lyric, and Pastoral Poets" Dublin Journal (15 April 1746).



All Folks have Faith in Satyr, but how few
Read Panegyricks, or believe them true?
Good Pliny, Trajan's Fariend, To-day would pass
For a low, fulsom, and pedantic Ass.
The Reason's plain: Brave, noble, just, and wise,
Are Words of Course, which Codrus misapplies;
For Names of Virtues in a Scribler's Hands
Imports Advowsons, Perquisites, and Lands;
And hence the gentle Reader smoaks, his Grace
Wants Fame, as much, as Codrus wants a Place.
But Merit, by the Public Voice confest,
Of Praise, or Satyr, well endues the Test.
Hear this, Hibernian Poets! and commend,
Or blame, our much belov'd, much honour'd Friend:
Down from your Garrets, blow the Trump of Fame
At either End; great CHESTERFIELD proclaim,
Nor fear to soil the Splendor of his Name.