1728 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Alexander Pope

A. B., "Alexander Pope's Nosegay: or, The Dunciad Epitomiz'd" Daily Journal (28 May 1728).



SIR,
If the following Verses, at first Sight, be thought too gross for a Place in your Paper, you'll however not refuse it that Favour, when you find it to be the faithful Contents of a Piece, lately publish'd, intitled the DUNCIAD, from P. 18, to P. 34. The whole of which is certainly the most filthy and indecent Instance of the True Profund that ever defiled the English Language. If, as a great Poet says, Want of Decency is Want of Wit, I am sure nothing can be a greater Instance of Folly than the DUNCIAD, and nobody can be so fit to exhibit the intended Progress of Dulness, as the Author of it.
I am, Sir,
Yours, &c. A. B.

First Jove strains hard to give Ambrosia Vent,
And wipes the Ichor from his F—da—nt.
C—l's Vomit, and his Mistress's Discharge
By Stool and Urine, next are sung at large.
Then with her T—d our Bard embrowns C—l's Face,
And fills with Stench the Strand's extended Space.
Eliza's Breasts, in Language most polite,
Are two Fore Buttocks, or Cows Udders hight.
Ch—d by C—l at Pissing overcome,
Crown'd with a Jordan, stalks contented home.
But who can bear the Stink from muddy Streams
Of Fleet-Ditch, rolling Carrion to the Thames?
Or the foul Images he draws from Jakes?
Or what a Dutchman plumps into the Lakes?

Thus P—e is dwindled to a Bog-house Wit,
And writes as filthy Stuff as others sh—.
Who reads P—e's Verses, or Dean Gully's Prose,
Must a strong Stomach have, or else no Nose.