1801 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Congreve

John Nichols, in Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, ed. John Nichols (1801) 14:87n.



He was certainly one of the most polite, pleasing and well bred men of his contemporaries. And it might have been said of him, as of Cowley, "You would not, from his conversation, have known him to have been a wit and a poet, it was so unassuming and courteous." Swift had always a great regard and affection for him; and introduced him, though a strenuous whig, to the favour of lord Oxford. It is remarkable, that on the first publication, Congreve thought "the Tale of a Tub" gross and insipid.