1772 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. William Mason

Edward Jerningham, "To Mr. Mason the Day before he published his English Garden" 1772; Jerningham, Poems (1779) 115-16.



Ye whom the ray of Genius warms,
Whom Fancy moves, and Nature charms,
Dismiss Amusement's idle toy,
Suspend the joys that know to cloy,
To higher pleasure dare aspire,
To-morrow MASON wakes his Lyre.

This Lyre the weeping Muses said,
Was as it lay on MONA'S head,
Stol'n by an angel in the night
And born to Heav'n's etherial height:
No so — this Lyre was lately found,
By Nature in her garden ground,
Interr'd in flow'rs of rich perfume,
While FLORA watch'd the fragrant tomb.

Bright Nature cast a fond survey,
Then brush'd the shading flow'rs away:
With her own wreath the cords entwin'd,
Then to her bard the shell resign'd,
And he to favor her desire,
To-morrow wakes the sounding Lyre.