1735 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Samuel Wesley the Younger

Alexander Pope to Samuel Wesley, 21 October 1735; Works of Pope, ed. Elwin and Courthope (1871-1889) 10:246.



TWITENHAM, Oct. 21 [1735].

DEAR SIR, — You letter had not been so long unanswered, but that I was not returned from a journey of some weeks when it arrived at this place. You may depend upon the money for the Earl of Peterborow, Mr. Bethel, Dr. Swift and Mr. Eckershall, which I will pay beforehand, to any one you shall direct; and I think you may set down Dr. Delany, whom I will write to. I desired my Lord Oxford, some months since to tell you this: it was just now upon my going to take a last leave of Lord Peterborow, in so much hurry that I had not time to write; and my Lord Oxford undertook to tell it you from me. I agree with you in the opinion of Savage's strange performance [The Progress of a Divine], which does not deserve the benefit of clergy. Mrs. Wesley has my sincere thanks for her good wishes in favour of this wretched tabernacle my body; the soul is so unhappy to inhabit it deserves her regard something better, because it really harbours much goodwill for her husband and herself, no man being more truly, dear sir, your affection and faithful servant.