1821 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman the Younger

John Taylor Esq., "On the Report that George Colman, Esq. had received the Honour of Knighthood at the Coronation" The Sun (23 July 1821).



So COLMAN has been dubb'd Sir Knight—
The gracious Monarch's boon was right,
The Bard deserves it well,
For those who know this Bard must know
With loyalty his feelings glow,
As all his efforts tell.

Prince HARRY when he gain'd the Crown,
Cast all his late companions down,
Discarding e'en old JACK;
Not all his humour could avail,
Not all the prompt facetious tale,
Not all his merry clack.

Unlike the Monarch of the play,
When Princely GEORGE gain'd regal sway,
Aloof from churlish pride,
Those who had shar'd his festive hour
He kept to profit by his pow'r,
Nor one was thrown aside.

Our Monarch's Set, indeed, we find,
Were comrades of a diff'rent kind
From HAL'S unlicens'd band,
For men with wit and knowledge stor'd
Partook of GEORGE'S princely board,
Men who adorn the land.

Hence COLMAN, just as ready, gay,
As Falstaff in each matchless Play,
With all his sportive vein,
Falstaff in head, but not in heart,
May well, without mean courtly art,
His Sov'reign's smile retain.

But let not e'en that Sov'reign's smile
Thee, COLMAN, from the Muse beguile,
And make thee slight her praise;
For justice, gratitude, must own,
She gave thee a Parnassian Throne,
And crown'd thee with her Bays.