1800 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Walsh

Edmond Malone, Note in Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden (1800) 3:53n.



Mr. Walsh, who is pronounced by Dryden, in his Postscript to the translation of Virgil, to have been "the best critick in the nation," and had the honour to be highly commended by Pope, was the son of Joseph Walsh, of Abberley, in Worcestershire, Esq., and was born in 1663. At the time, therefore, of the publication of this piece [Dialogue concerning Women], he was twenty-eight years old. He lived in much intimacy with our author, who corresponded with him; and some of Dryden's letters to Walsh represented the county of Worcester, in parliament, in the years 1698 and 1699, and afterwards, in 1707, he was member for Richmond, in Yorkshire. He died in 1708.

Dennis, who tells us he knew Walsh very well, says, "he was a learned, candid, judicious gentleman.... He loved to be well dressed, — and thought it no disparagement of his understanding."