1829 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Wilson Croker

Lord Eldon to John Wilson Croker, 1829; The Croker Papers, ed. Louis J. Jennings (1884) 1:443.



DEAR CROKER,

There are mistakes in the enclosed as to the "locus in quo," &c. When, by the kindness of Sir R. Chambers, I lived in the house belonging to him as Principal at New Inn Hall at Oxford, and was his deputy reading his Vinerian lectures, he, Dr. Johnson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and, as well as I can remember, one or two other persons came from London to Oxford. Walking in the garden at New Inn Hall, Sir R. Chambers threw some snails over his garden wall. "Sir," said Johnson, "what you are doing is very unmannerly to your neighbour." Sir Robert said, jocosely, "Why, Dr., he is not a Churchman," or "he is a Dissenter " — I cannot at this distance of time be quite positive as to the words. "Oh," says the Doctor, laughing, "why then, throw away as hard as you can." This is the most accurate account my memory enables me to give you as to what passed more than half a century ago.

Yours, my dear Sir, with respect and kind regards,

ELDON.