1842 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

James Hogg

C. H. Timperley, in Encyclopaedia of Literary and Typographical Anecdote (1842) 2:840n.



James Hogg, originally a shepherd in the secluded district of Ettrick, in Scotland, enjoys the merit of having, from the condition of an unlettered peasant, struggled through many unfavourable and adverse circumstances, into a literary reputation which many men possessing every advantage might well envy. His qualifications as a poet have been described as "great facility in the use of poetical fiction and imagery, a lively conception of natural beauty, with a quick and prolific fancy to body forth his conceptions." His principal works are, the Queen's Wake, 1813; followed by two volumes of Dramatic Tales, the Pilgrims of the Sun, 1815; Queen Hynde, 1825; Winter Evening Tales, and the Shepherd's Calendar. He died November 21, 1835, aged 59 years.