1842 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Francis Quarles

C. H. Timperley, in Encyclopaedia of Literary and Typographical Anecdote (1842) 2:500.



1644, Sept. 8. Died, FRANCIS QUARLES, author of the Emblems, &c. He was born near Rumford, in Essex, in 1592, and became secretary to archbishop Usher, was afterwards chronologer to the city of London, and wrote much in both prose and verse; but is principal work was his Emblems, a set of quaint pictorial designs, referring to moral and religious ideas, and each elucidated by a few appropriate verses. His Enchiridion, a series of moral and political observations, is also worthy of notice. His verses were more popular in their own time than those of the gayest court poets, being recommended by a peculiar harshness and gloom, accordant with the feelings of a large portion of the people. The Emblems have been reprinted. Quarles was also the author of a comedy, called the Virgin Widow, 1621.