1743 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Warton

Thomas Warton the Elder to Joseph Warton, 3 August 1743; Wooll, Biographical Memoirs of Joseph Warton (1806) 212.



Basingstoke, Aug. 3d, 1743.

I thank my dear Son for both his letters. In that of the eighth inst. you tell me that you are to go to Cuddesden the very next day, whereas old Mr. Jackson writes me word from thence, that he has paid you only five guineas (pounds he means) but is willing to pay the remainder whenever it is asked. His letter bears date the 19th of July. I design therefore to go and receive it immediately. His son left me the 18th of April last. You do not mention your battels in yours of the 17th. Are they paid? I would not have you satisfied with the prospect of more of Robinson's exhibitions than the very first, pray secure that; for you may depend on it, what was told you of future chances was because you have competitors. 'Tis but a month now before you lose your room: look out another (some friend's in the College, if possible) without delay.

If you could take your degree in Michaelmas term, it would be much better (on account of R.'s exhibition) than staying till Lent. Pray stand the first vacancy. I cannot help being solicitous about this, for some reasons lately found out. Tell me your thoughts soon; and how you last out as to money. I will do my utmost to supply you, but cannot specify the time. However, be chearful, you shall never want encouragement as far as is in the power of,

My dear Joe,

your entirely affect. Father,

T. WARTON.

I beg you to write speedily and particularly. — All here are well, and joyn in love and service. Recollect

Qui studet optatam cursu contingere metam,
Multa tulit fecitq; Puer.