1824 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Byron

John Taylor Esq., "The Last Words of Lord Byron" The Sun (14 August 1824).



I die content, with the sweet hope that GREECE
Will triumph o'er her foes, and dwell in peace:
Drive all Oppressors from her classic land,
That LIBERTY may then securely stand.
My CHRISTIAN SOV'REIGNS, who deserve the name,
Her INDEPENDENCE cheerfully proclaim;
Deem it the duty that to MAN they owe,
A just return for all their state below.
And may those Kings, detested by the wise,
Those HOLY HYPOCRITES, to pride ALLIES,
Become less haughty when they hear my fall,
And feel that they must share the fate of all.
Feel, too, more kindly towards the Grecian Race,
And die less mark'd by hatred and disgrace.
But you, brave GREEKS, pursue your bright career,
Your savage foes will fly, distraught with fear.
Let FREEDOM'S emblems on your banners shine,
And e'en be stamp'd upon the Hallow'd Shrine;
And let your Heroes, till their latest breath,
Exclaim, "DELIVERANCE TO GREECE, OR DEATH!"
T.