1796 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

W. T., "The bloody Attempt of Polyphemus, a fierce Irish Giant, to destroy the Duke of Bedford's House" Morning Chronicle (7 March 1796).



AN EPIGRAM.
In RUSSELL'S Porch low-crouching EDMUND stands,
And grasps Corinthian columns with his hands;
His huge, vast bulk the Giant sudden rears,
In hopes to pull the House about his ears.

The Monster's aim the laughing LARES ey'd,
Resist his efforts, and confound his pride;
FREEDOM, brave Mountain-nymph, defends the Youth,
And guards her RUSSELL with the shield of Truth.

Depriv'd of Mental sight, fierce POLYPHEME
Plays on our Fancy like an Attic dream:—
Bor'd by the brand of Shame, he gropes along,
Enrag'd yet harmless, and despis'd tho' strong!

ANOTHER.
As erst, depriv'd of sight, Philistia's Court
Brought SAMSON forward but to make them sport;
Another Court, O! BURKE, if right I see,
To make them pastime now exhibits thee!

In second Childhood long may'st thou enjoy
Thy Rattle (Rhet'ric), Reason's glitt'ring Toy;
To FREEDOM'S cause let RUSSELL still incline,
And drop a Tear at such Eclipse as thine!
Hackney.