1816 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

St. George Tucker

A Young Lady of Virginia, "On Reading some Lines of Judge Tucker's, 'Days of my Youth'" Connecticut Mirror 4 March 1816).



Blest is the virtuous man! his eve of day
To him no horror brings, he dreads no change;
But calmly marks of life the sure decay;
His soul ordain'd beyond the world to range.

Thus Tucker meets without one murmur'd sigh,
That foe so dreaded — all destroying Time,
Nor mourns the furrow'd cheek, or darken'd eye,
Or the lost vigour of his youthful prime.

Grown grey in all that can adorn the man,
He in the wane of life, knows no regrets:
Still careful is, fair virtue's flame to fan,
And, like the sun, irradiates, ere he sets.

Long may his light be spared on earth to shine,
Long ere it sinks beneath the clay "cold sod;"
Yet then, e'en then, 'twill rise with beams divine,
And brightened lustre 'fore the throne of God.

For blest the sage approv'd! his eve of day,
To him no horror brings, he dreads no change;
But calmly marks of life the sure decay;
His soul ordain'd beyond this world to range.