1828 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John G. C. Brainard

D. D., "Appended to a Copy of Brainard's Poems" Connecticut Mirror (10 November 1828).



Minstrel, farewell!
Sadly thy harp is slumbering,
Its golden cords unstrung—
Thy voice that woke its echoing,
Its cygnet note hath sung;
And voice and harp will slumber on
Till Time's last ling'ring sands have run;
Minstrel, farewell!

Friend thou art gone!
We meet no more thy warm embrace
With cordial friendship stor'd—
We greet no more thy welcome face
Around our social board—
Thy wonted seat is vacant now,
And thou our friend, Oh! where art thou?
Alas! thou'rt gone!

Brother adieu!
We mourn thy early destiny,
Thou nearest, dearest, best—
Aye, bitterly we wept to see
The grave close o'er thy breast—
But 'twas His will, then let us stand
Submissive 'neath his chastening hand!
Brother adieu!

Son, thou hast fled!
Thou wert a green and verdant leaf,
And I am pale and sere!
Yet thou hast fallen! while in grief,
I still am lingering here!
My noble, Oh! my darling boy,
Thou wert thy father's hope and joy!
Yet thou hast fled!

"Christian, all hail!"
Here with our songs of love and praise,
Thy voice will wake again,
Thy harp, in loudest notes shall raise
An everlasting strain!
Our God and thine, who knows no end,
Will be thy Father, Brother, Friend!
"Christian, all hail!"