1784 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman the Younger

T. S., "The Court of Apollo. Addressed to George Colman, Esq. on his celebrated Dramatic Piece called Two to One" Morning Chronicle (8 July 1784).



Apollo held a Court, (they say)
As 'tis his custom (t' other day)
To hear each suit; attend the claim
Of ev'ry candidate for fame.
Th' assemblage crouded (we infer)
Like Colman's Royal Theatre,
In Play-house phrases (we presume),
Nor sitting there, or standing room.
The God of Harmony and Song
Survey'd the literary throng;
Plac'd as he was, sublimely high,
No suitor there escap'd his eye,
Howe'er obscur'd or press'd aloof,
Beneath that vast capacious roof,
Where merit shone apparent. He
Admitted no coy, bashful plea,
Tho' bold intrusion he repell'd,
Yet modest genius he upheld;
Among the last; a youthful bard
Attracted much his high regard.
Phoebus at once pronounc'd his name,
For why he knew from whence he came:
Then with a gracious look benign,
The God exclaim'd! "The palm is thine;
With you 'twill flourish as I ween;
'Tis Two to One — an evergreen!
Admit him strait at my command;
There, go, and by your father stand;
Take aid of learning from your Sire,
Your genius, Phoebus, shall inspire;
No small addition you have won,
His Heir — but my adopted Son."