1765 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Richard Cumberland

W. K., (William Kenrick?), "Stanzas on The Summer's Tale" St. James's Chronicle (10 December 1765).



A Summer's Tale, one would have thought,
Some Summer Fruitage might have brought;
But this our Hope deceives:
Not even here one vernal Breeze,
No Buds of Spring, no verdant Trees,
But all autumnal Leaves.

No chearful Sea-Coal Fire remains,
To thaw our frozen Ears and Veins,
But all looks dead and cold:
The Stage is "cumber'd," and the "Land,"
This Summer's Tale none understand.
Dull as a Tale twice told.

If not a Summer, some small Spring,
We might expect in such a Thing,
If Phoebus had thought fit:
But pelting Hail, and Snow, and Rain,
Distract us, like Amelia's* Brain,
Mad with such Winter Wit.

* A mad Character in the Summer's Tale.