1767 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman

Oxon, "Upon the Translation of Terence, by Mr. Colman; and Plautus, by Mr. Thornton" St. James's Chronicle (27 January 1767).



Vain France loudly boasts of her matchless Translator,
(The fam'd Madam Dacier) and great Commentator!
Some Classicks by her are so nicely befrench'd,
And she in her Learning so deeply intrench'd,
That none must hereafter dare hazard their Fame,
In Terence and Plautus, to cope with that Dame:
Can Learning, mere Learning, the Comic Muse hit:
'Tis all random Shot, without Humour and Wit:
Madam Dacier could read, understand what she read,
But never with Latin and Greek raise the Dead!
From the dead Roman Tongue to revive Wit in ours,
Wit alone should translate with the same kindred Powers;
For Colman writes Dramas with Nature and Skill,
And Thornton has shewn us, he can if he will.