1768 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Bonnell Thornton

M. D., "On Reading Mr. Thornton's Battle of the Wigs" St. James's Chronicle (20 February 1768).



SIR,
The great Entertainment I received from reading Mr. Thornton's Battle of the Wigs, and the Satisfaction I enjoyed from his Acquaintance when at Oxford, have tempted me to express my Sentiments of him, and his Muse, in a few Lines, which, I hope, from the Merit of their Subject, will not prove unworthy of a Place in your Paper.
I am, Sir,
Your most obedient Servant,
W. D.

Say, Thornton, say, what most shall we admire,
Thy genuine Humour, or poetic Fire?
No envious Spleen dwells rankling in thy Heart;
Thy generous Satire bears no venom'd Dart:
With all the Pow'rs of keenest Wit possest,
Still is thy Muse with mild Good-Nature blest.

So have we seen the Aurora of the North
Her Sun-like Radiance instant darting forth;
Pleas'd the Spectators wonder at her Beams,
Whilst in the Sky an harmless Lightning gleams.
Monday, Feb. 15.