1795 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edmund Burke

B. W., "Inscription under a Bust of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke" St. James's Chronicle (21 July 1795).



Let Envy hiss, and venal Faction rage,
Still BURKE shall prove the Wonder of the Age!
The Man that steady to his Trust appears,
And multiplies his Honours with his Years;
Above all low, above all sordid Ends,
True to himself, his Country, and his Friends;
Resolv'd in deeds, as noble in his Views,
Thinks what he ought, and what he thinks pursues;
With Eyes prophetick sees a Kingdom's Fate,
And is the Wise Ulysses of the State;
In Honour spotless, as in Sense refin'd,
The brighest Fancy with the purest Mind;
Who, blest with Wit, Jove's Thunders to impart,
Still more excels in Eloquence of Heart;
With Breast heroick, as with Conscience free,
Sublim'd, by Worth, for Immortality;
Caress'd and reverenc'd by the Good and Wise,
May well the Gall of Ignorance despise.

Like yon fair Orb that rules the chearful Day,
No transient Storms divert him from his Way;
Tho' Clouds awhile may veil him from our Sight,
He soon beams forth with renovated Light.