1807 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Nahum Tate

Robert Southey, in Specimens of the Later English Poets (1807) 1:173.



The worthy successor of Shadwell as Court Poet, the worthy accomplice of Nicholas Brady in berhyming the Psalms, and the unworthy assistant of Dryden in Absolom and Achitophel. He was indeed a pitiful poet; but, says Oldys, he was a free, good-natured, fuddling companion. His latter days were spent in the Mint, as a place of refuge from his creditors. The specimens are selected from his collection of Poems by several hands and on several occasions, 1685. As they have no name affixed to them they may be ascribed to Nahum himself.