1713 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas D'Urfey

Richard Steele, Guardian No. 29 (1713); Moulton, Library of Literary Criticism (1901-05) 2:687.



A judicious author some years since published a collection of sonnets, which he very successfully called Laugh and be Fat; or, Pills to purge Melancholy. I cannot sufficiently admire the facetious title of these volumes, and must censure the world of ingratitude, while they are so negligent in rewarding the jocose labours of my friend Mr. D'Urfey, who was so large a contributor to this treatise, and to whose humorous productions so many rural squires are obliged for the dignity and state which copulency gives them. The story of the sick man's breaking an imposthume by a sudden fit of laughter, is too well known to need a recital. It is my opinion, that the above pills would be extremely proper to be taken with asses' milk, and mightily contribute towards the renewing and restoring decayed lungs.