1777 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas D'Urfey

Anonymous, in "Thomas D'Urfey" Westminster Magazine 5 (October 1777) 566.



The compositions of D'Urfey are so many, and so singularly humourous, that they elude all description, save that they are in general mirthful in the highest degree; and that such of them as were not liable to exception, on account of their indelicacy, became favourites with the whole kingdom. Mr. Addison, in a paper in the Guardian, No. 67, after exhibiting a lively portrait of D'Urfey, whom he is pleased to call his old friend and cotemporary, speaking to the Ladies, his disciples, says, that he had often made their grandmothers merry; and that his sonnets had perhaps lulled asleep many a toast among the Ladies then living, when she lay in her cradle.