1712 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Richard Blackmore

Thomas Newcomb, in Bibliotheca, 1712; Nichols, Select Collection of Poems (1780-82) 3:25.



But who can mention Maurus' name,
Without a line to crown his fame;
Upon whose brows inspiring hung
Large poppy wreaths, whene'er he sung,
Whose kindred rhymes their nature keep,
Gently disposing folks to sleep?
Then say, great Mirror of our Time,
(Not half to fam'd for cures as rhyme)
Why should'st thou other means pursue
To heal with drugs, when verse will do?
Five tender distichs, from those strains
Where Arthur moans, and Job complains,
Shall ever boast a power to steep
The wakeful'st eyes in downy sleep.
When strongest opiates nought avail,
Prescribe thy Muse, 'twill never fail;
Ne'er trouble physick with a cure,
Each page of thine will work as sure;
With whatsoever ills opprest,
'Tis sure to give thy patient rest.