1790 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Peele

Edmond Malone, in Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare (1790; 1821) 2:248-49.



Palin [in Colin Clouts Come Home Againe] is doubtless the abbreviation of Palinode, which Spenser has used as the name of a shepherd in his fifth Eclogue; and, I conceive, was here intended to represent George Peele, a distinguished poet of that time, who was nearly of Spenser's age, and had commenced a poetical writer about the same time with him. He is thus denominated on the same principle which appears to have guided the author in the choice of several of the adumbrations found in these verses, in consequence of Peele's having published, in 1589, a high eulogy on Lord Essex, a nobleman for whom Spenser had the greatest respect. In this piece the interlocutors are Piers and Palinode.