1705 ca. ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Samuel Wesley

Francis Knapp, in "Epistle to Mr. B.," 1705 ca.; Nichols, Select Collection of Poems (1780-82) 4:289.



Dear Friend, I hear that you, of late, are grown
One of those squeamish critics of the town,
That think they have a license to abuse
Each honest author, that pretends to muse.
But be advis'd: why should you spend your time
In Heathenish satire 'cause a fool will rhyme?
Poor harmless Wesley! let him write again,
Be pitied in his old heroic strain;
Let him in reams proclaim himself a dunce,
And break a dozen stationers at once.
What is't to you? Why should you take't amiss,
If Grubstreet's stock'd with tenants? if the press
Is hugely plied, and labours to produce
Some mighty folio, for the chandler's use?
Let Grubstreet scribble on; nor need you care,
Though every garret held a poet there.