1982 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Puttenham

Mark Eccles, in "Brief Lives" Studies in Philology 79 (1982) 109.



His will left all his goods to his servant, Mary Symes, widow, "as well for the good service she did him as alsoe for the money which she had layed forth for him." Mary Simmes, as his administratrix, in 1612|13 sued Sir Richard Paulet, grandson of Richard Paulet, the first husband of Puttenham's wife (Req. 2|414|196), saying that Sir Richard and his parents had claimed title to Puttenham's house in Whitefriars and taken away his books and other goods. She said that she had spent what little she had on Puttenham and had kept him in his sickness and was now not able to live, being "extreame poore." Paulet answered that Puttenham, "an ill-disposed man, much bent to troubles," had much abused his wife by keeping the plaintiff and other lewd women, as the world knows.