1780 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. William Broome

Samuel Johnson to Joseph Warton, 23 May 1780; Wooll, Biographical Memoirs of Joseph Warton (1806) 390.



May 23d, 1780.

Dear Sir,

It is unnecessary to tell you how much I was obliged by your useful memorials. The shares of Fenton and Broom in the Odyssey I had before from Mr. Spence. Dr. Warburton did not know them. I wish to be told, as the question is of great importance in the poetical world, whence you had your intelligence: if from Spence, it shows at least his consistency; if from any other, it confers corroboration. If any thing useful to me should occur, I depend upon your friendship.

Be pleased to make my compliments to the ladies of your house, and to the gentleman that honoured me with the Greek Epigrams when I had, what I hope sometime to have again, the pleasure of spending a little time with you at Winchester. I am,

Dear Sir,

Your most obliged and

most humble servant,

SAM JOHNSON.