1791 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Richard Savage

Joseph Mawbey, in "Anecdotes of Thomas Cooke" Gentleman's Magazine 61 (December 1791) 1093.



The Spy alluded to in the Preface [to Thomas Cooke's Battle of the Poets], and expressly named in the poem itself, was Savage, who, it seems, lived in convivial familiarity with many of Pope's literary enemies, and, at the same time, courted Pope with much servility. He is said to have furnished Pope with most of the private anecdotes of the authors mentioned in the Dunciad. Cooke, in a note to his poem, says "Mr. Pope seems to have had the same person in his eye, where, speaking of himself, he says,

Nor like a puppy daggled thro' the town
To fetch and carry sin, long up and down.
Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot.