1614 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Chapman

Thomas Freeman, "To George Chapman" in Rubbe, and a Great Cast. Epigrams" (1614) sig. K2.



George, it is thy Genius innated;
Thou pick'st not flowers from another's field,
Stol'n Similies, or Sentences translated,
Nor seekest, but what thine own soile doth yield:
Let barren wits go borrow what to write,
'Tis bred and borne with thee what thou inditest,
And our Comedians thou out-strippest quite,
And all the Hearers more then all delightest,
With unaffected Stile and sweetest Straine,
Thy in-ambitious Pen keeps on her pace,
And cometh near'st the ancient Commicke veine,
Thou hast beguilde us all of that sweet grace;
And were Thalia to be sold and bought,
No Chapman but thy selfe were to be sought.