1768 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Spence

W. S. T., "On the Death of the Rev. Joseph Spence, Professor of History in the University of Oxford" Oxford Magazine 1 (September 1768) 115.



Spence, art thou gone, "Oxonia's greatest pride,"
Where ev'ry Grace, and ev'ry Muse reside.
Oft has the Muse, enraptur'd, drank thy lore,
And still the more she drank, admir'd the more.
The tuneful bard, the first of Phoebus' train,
Who sung a Stuart's and a Brunswic's reign;
Who snatch'd a chaplet from Maeonia's flow'rs,
And made a Homer and a Statius ours:
Whom Windsor's forest owes immortal fame,
True to the Poet's and the Patriot's flame;
Even Pope confest, when first thou cam'st abroad,
Thy censure just, and kiss'd the critic's rod.
But now, like his, thy body mould'ring lies,
An equal burst of glory thou may'st claim,
The same thy merit, and thy toil the same.
Coll. Pemb. Oxon.
6 Sept. 1768.