1798 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

David Mallet

Alexander Campbell, in Introduction to the History of Poetry in Scotland (1798) 213-14.



On his arrival in London he was introduced to the literati of England. Among the number were Hill, Young, Dennis, Pope, Johnson, Garrick, Theobald, Cook, &c. and his talents, versatile, and splendid, were soon displayed in the various walks of polite literature. The late Prince of Wales headed at that time, the Opposition. Among his chosen few, were, the author of the Seasons, and his countryman, the subject of this memoir. They were both pensioned — O shame, shame, must talents ever bend thus! — When poverty is the heritage of the lowly, must genius, and the higher acquirements of intellect, be bartered for gain? But the dread of physical want, led Mallet to forfeit present, in hopes of obtaining the means of an future independence. In this his ultimate, chief good he at last succeeded.