1748 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Lyttelton

James Thomson, in Castle of Indolence (1748) 33-34.



Another Guest there was, of Sense refin'd,
Who felt each Worth, for every Worth he had;
Serene yet warm, humane yet firm his Mind,
As little touch'd as any Man's with Bad:
Him through their inmost Walks the Muses lad,
To him the sacred Love of Nature lent,
And sometimes would he make our Valley glad;
Whenas we found he would not here be pent,
To him the better Sort this friendly Message sent.

"Come, dwell with us! true Son of Virtue, come!
But if, alas! we cannot Three persuade,
To lie content beneath our peaceful Dome,
Ne ever more to quit our quiet Glade;
Yet when at last thy Toils, but ill apaid,
Shall dead thy Fire, and damp its Heavenly Spark,
Thou wilt be glad to seek the Rural Shade,
There to indulge the Muse, and Nature mark:
We then a Lodge for Thee will rear in HAGLEY-PARK."