1762 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Lauder

Charles Churchill, in The Ghost, Book II (1762); Poetical Works of Charles Churchill, ed. William Tooke (1804) 2:53-54.



By Truth inspir'd, our Bacon's force
Open'd the way to learning's source;
Boyle through the works of nature ran,
And Newton, something more than man,
Div'd into nature's hidden springs,
Laid bare the principles of things,
Above the earth our spirits bore,
And gave us worlds unknown before.
By Truth inspired, when Lauder's spite
O'er Milton cast the veil of night,
Douglas arose, and through the maze
Of intricate and winding ways
Came where the subtle traitor lay,
And dragg'd him, trembling, to the day;
Whilst he, (O shame to noblest parts!
Dishonour to the lib'ral arts,
To traffic in so vile a scheme!)
Whilst he, our letter'd Polypheme,
Who had confederate forces join'd,
Like a base coward skulk'd behind.