1794 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Thomas Blacklock

Robert Alves, in Sketches of a History of Literature (1794) 176.



Dr. Thomas Blacklock was born at Annan 1721. He lost his sight by the small pox when he was five months old, so that he could have no remembrance of the objects of sight which he describes with such life and propriety in his poems. He is one of the most correct of our Scotch bards. The best of his poetical pieces seem to be his imitation of the 104th Psalm, some of his pastorals, Urania, the Coquet, Ode to Benevolence, and his Complaint on his own situation upon the loss of his father, his blindness, and his narrow escape from drowning; which last in particular, is written in a very elevated and affecting strain of poetry.