1777 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Gen. John Burgoyne

Horace Walpole to William Mason, 4 October 1777; Letters, ed. Cunningham (1906) 6:494.



You ask the history of Burgoyne the Pompous. He is a natural son of Lord Bingley, who put him in the entail of the estate, but when young Lane came of age the entail was cut off. He ran away with the old Lord Derby's daughter, and has been a fortunate gamester. Junius was thought unjust, as he was never supposed to do more than play very well. I have heard him speak in Parliament, just as he writes; for all his speeches were written and laboured, and yet neither in them nor in his conversation, did he ever impress me with an idea of his having parts. He is however a very useful commander, for he feeds the Gazette and the public, while the Howes and the war are so dumb.