1854 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Gen. John Burgoyne

Robert Shelton Mackenzie, Note in Noctes Ambrosianae, ed. Mackenzie (1854) 1:141n.



This is the General Burgoyne who had a British command here, in the Revolutionary war, and issued an address to the native Indians, in such an inflated and turgid style as to fix on him the sobriquet of Chrononhotonthologos. His surrender at Saratoga, with all his army, caused much dissatisfaction in England, and one of the epigrams of the day, which also embodied the name of the successful American general, ran thus:

Burgoyne, unconscious of impending fates,
Could cut his way through woods — but not through "Gates."

He was dismissed the British service for having refused to return to America, (his visit to England being on his parole) pursuant to the terms of the convention, but was restored three years after. He was a successful dramatic writer.