1812 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Charles Churchill

John Nichols, in Literary Anecdotes of the XVIII Century (1812-15) 8:111.



Though Pope turned all he wrote into wit and into gold, yet it may be questioned whether Churchill, that able and intrepid Satirist (who, as somebody spoke of him, "had the courage to write what others had not courage to think") did not demand and obtain more money from the Booksellers. Churchill tried with his political friend [Wilkes], the popular author of the North Briton, "how far the liberty of the press would carry him." His Satires were as much read (the first day of publication was almost the sale of an edition), and he had as extensive a field as Pope's. His pen, like the sword of Michael the Archangel in Milton, mowed down whole ranks at a time, and inflicted wounds that never closed.