1592 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Christopher Marlowe

Robert Greene, in Greene's Groatsworth of Wit (1592); Censura Literaria 4 (1807) 43.



Wonder not, for with thee will I first beginne, thou famous graces of Tragedians, that Greene, who hath said with thee (like the fool) in his heart, "There is no GOD," should now give glory unto his greatnesse: for penetrating is his power, his hand lies heavy upon me. Why should thy excellent wit, his gift, be so blinded that thou shouldest give no glory to the Giver? O swinish folly! what are his rules but mere confused mockeries, able to extirpate, in small time, the generation of mankinde. I know the least of my demerits merit this miserable death; but wilfull striving against knowne truth, exceedeth all the terrors of my soule. Defuse not (with me) till this last poynt of extremity; for little knowest thou, how in the end thou shalt be visited.