1618 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Christopher Marlowe

Edmond Rudierde, Thunderbolt of God's Wrath against Hard-hearted and Stiffe-necked Sinners (1618); Moulton, Library of Literary Criticism (1901) 1:347.



We read of one Marlow a Cambridge scholler, who was a poet and a filthy playmaker; this wretche accounted that meeke servant of God, Moses, to be but a conjurer, and our sweete Saviour but a seducer and deceiver of the people. But harken, ye brain-sicke and prophane poets and players, that bewitch idle eares with foolish vanities, what fell upon this prophane wretch: — having a quarrell against one whom he met in a street in London, and would have stab'd him; but the partie perceiving his villany prevented him with catching his hand and turning his owne dagger into his braines, and so blaspheming and cursing he yeelded up his stinking breath. Marke this, ye players, that live by making fooles laugh at sinne and wickedness.