1835 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

George Colman

Robert Southey to C. W. W. Wynn, June 1835; New Letters, ed. Currey (1965) 2:425.



Two Bensleys, brothers, were at Westminster with Cowper, and one of these was a Member of the Nonsense Club, of which I make out six members: Thornton, Colman, Bensley, Lloyd, Hill, and Cowper, but know not who was the seventh. It was a Westminster club you know. Churchill it certainly was not. A great deal of good Nonsense was conceived there. I suspect that the Odes to Obscurity and Oblivion, and the Ode for S. Cecilias day [by Bonnell Thornton], with its mock performances, and Thornton's Exhibition of Sign Painters may have originated there.