1763 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. John Ogilvie

John Langhorne, in Genius and Valour: A Scotch Pastoral (1763) 22.



Th' ethereal Brilliance of poetic Fire,
The mighty Hand that smites the sounding Lyre,
Strains that on Fancy's strongest Pinion rise,
Conceptions vast, and Thoughts that grasp the Skies,
To the rapt Youth that mused on SHAKSPEAR'S Grave,
To OGILVIE the Muse of PINDAR gave.
TIME, as he sung, a Moment ceas'd to fly,
And lazy SLEEP unfolded half his Eye.
Too soon he tried one ill-adapted Song,
And the chain'd Numbers faintly toil'd along.
Fit for no youthful, for no rhyming Lay,
Was the dread Pomp of Judgment's aweful Day.
But wake, sweet Bard, the Theban Lyre again;
With ancient Valour swell the sounding Strain;
Hail the high Trophies by thy Country won,
The Wreaths that flourish for each valiant Son.