1611 ca. ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Campion

John Davies of Hereford, "To the most judicious and excellent Lyrick Poet, Doctor Campion" in Scourge of Folly (1611 ca.); Davies, Works, ed. Grosart (1878) 2:55.



Upon my selfe I should just vengeance take
Should I omitt thy mention in my rimes,
Whose Lines and Notes do lullaby (awake)
In heav'ns of pleasure, these unpleasant times.
Never did Lyricks more then happie straines,
(Strain'd out of Arte by Nature, so, with ease)
So purely hitt the moods, and various vaines
Of musick and her hearers, as do these.
So, thou canst cure the body, and the minde
(Rare Doctor) with thy two-fold soundest arte:
Hipocrates hath taught thee the one kinde,
Apollo and the Muse the other part:
And both so well; that thou with both doth please:
The minde with pleasure; and the corps with ease.