1778 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Hannah More

Samuel Johnson, 1778; Boswell, Life of Johnson (1791); ed. G. B. Hill (1891) 3:333-34.



Talking of Miss M—, a literary lady, he said, "I was obliged to speak to Miss Reynolds to let her know that I desired she would not flatter me so much." Somebody now observed, "She flatters Garrick." JOHNSON. "She is in the right to flatter Garrick. She is in the right for two reasons; first, because she has the world with her, who have been praising Garrick these thirty years; and secondly, because she is rewarded for it by Garrick. Why should she flatter me? I can do nothing for her. Let her carry her praise to a better market. (Then turning to Mrs. Knowles). You, Madam, have been flattering me all the evening; I wish you would give Boswell a little now. If you knew his merit as well as I do, you would say a great deal; he is the best travelling companion in the world."