1790 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Henry James Pye

Isaac D'Israeli, in Defence of Poetry (1790) 3-4.



To thee, my PYE, for whom the Muses wove
The greenest laurels of the Aonian grove
(For in Refinement's theme at once conspire
The Sage's learning and the Poet's fire):
To thee I write, ambitious of thy praise,
And, blushing, offer these imperfect lays.
So when the new-fledg'd bird, with anxious pain,
Waves it's light wing, and tries the' aetherial plain,
As all unform'd it's warm untutor'd song
The echoing groves and vocal vales prolong,
Asham'd to own the wildness of it's strain,
At distance sighs, and lingers round the plain:
But if the known Maternal voice invite,
And pour it's music in suspended flight,
Listening it hears, and thro' th' aerial ways
Mounts on it's tender wing, and all it's soul essays.