1795 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir William Jones

Thomas Maurice, in "An Elegiac and Historical Poem, sacred to the Memory and Virtues of the Honourable Sir William Jones" (1795); Maurice, Select Poems (1803) 30.



Let tyrants, to embalm, their loathsome clay
Of half her fragrant gums Arabia drain,
Recording brass their martial feats display,
And venal marbles breathe the flatterer's strain:

Thy tomb no trophies wants, illustrious shade!
Nor breathing brass thy virtues to proclaim;
Thine are the radiant palms which never fade,
A tower of adamant thy deathless name!

To spread thy fame two rival worlds contend,
To worth, to learning, and to genius, just;
And Love's and Friendship's mingling tears descend,
To embalm thy memory, and bedew thy dust.

Immortal Genius! whose expansive flame,
In early youth, on Isis' banks I caught;
Whose path I follow'd up the steeps of fame,
And, by thy precepts, form'd the ripening thought....