1789 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Philip Neve

Edmond Malone, 1789; Maloniana in Sir James Prior, Edmond Malone (1860) 395-96.



Yesterday (June 19) I passed an hour very agreeably in Furnival's Inn with Mr. P. H. Neve, a young gentleman who has lately printed some miscellaneous observations on the English poets, and is much devoted to literary pursuits. His chambers look on the garden of Furnival's Inn, a very sequestered spot which I had never before happened to look at. Yet he complained that it was not private enough, and talked of moving elsewhere. He showed me many rare autographs, and a curious memorandum which he found lately in Milton's book in defence of the people of England; in which the former possessor of the book says in Latin, that Milton's brother (who was, I think, a judge of one of the courts at Westminster) told him that with all the legal arguments in that book, Milton was furnished by the celebrated Bradshaw, president of the court that put Charles I to death.